Horse Lessons

meeting the boys

 

As much as I talk and write about horses, I’m not much of a rider. I can’t claim the crown of being a horsewoman. I ride too infrequently and never get to know one horse long enough to really learn to speak horse. This has left me a perpetual beginner and an eternal learner in the equine world. Still I have learned much from the horsewomen I know.

From Karleen I learned to halt the horse by breathing out, sitting deep and looking up.

From Beth I learned the horse is a mirror.

From Helga I learned the power of a collected walk.

From Disa I learned to smile and dust off your pants when dumped from the saddle unharmed.

From Bev I learned to only ride as fast as the slowest rider in the group.

From Kat I learned a cheerful attitude relaxes horse and rider.

From Karleen I learned equilibrium by riding a horse bareback.

From Helga I learned transitioning from walk to trot to tölt.

From Bev I learned to listen to my instincts.

From Claudia I learned to sit the trot.

From Karleen I learned to sing in a tölt.

From Helga I learned an Icelandic saying: “I like my horses fast and my men wild. “

From Esther I learned you’re never too old to enjoy a canter across the mudflats of Lake Hop.

From Christina I learned how to let the horse go.

From Beth I learned that horses can heal you.

HelgMeKatAtSea

For weekly writing prompt: Student, Teacher

20 thoughts on “Horse Lessons

  1. Bevery

    i loved this post, because all of these things not only apply to horses, but so many other things in life. And these little sentences, wisps of precious thoughts, sink deep into our subconscious and stay with us longer than our telephone number.

    Reply
  2. Kathryn

    Horses are powerful healers. Marc spent a weekend working with horses and Martha Beck and his soul is so happy. He is smiling and playing through life. Horses do communicate deeply…we are so blessed.

    Reply
    1. Icelandica Post author

      It’s a four-beated gait that the Icelandic horse has. There are other horse breeds that have something similar, like the Tennessee Walker and Paso Fino.

      Reply
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  5. The Fourth Continent

    That’s a poignant ending, one that suggests more to the story….! I hope one day you may be able to share the healing power of horses.

    By the way, you are American right? If you get hgtv, I am on HOUSE HUNTERS INTERNATIONAL tonight with Greenland. 🙂 apparently some people have heard of the show 🙂

    Cheers,
    Tanny

    Reply
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  9. Dan

    I remember training my horse to neck-reign and to go from a walk into a canter with only leg pressure and neck-reigning. It was a very satisfying experience for both of us. Horses and dogs make the world a better place.

    Reply
      1. Dan

        I had a Siamese once. I was able to tolerate it because it had some canine-like behaviors. I called it a watchcat. It would run across the back of the couch and peer out the door when someone knocked and hiss at those she didn’t like. Still too sneaky for me though. A dog will eventually stop misbehaving but a cat will continue to get into mischief. When you walk toward the kitchen you’ll hear their feet hit the floor before you get there. They know they aren’t supposed to be on the table or counters but do it anyway. Good luck with that. Don’t leave anything edible out unattended.

        I watched some of the Justin Timberlake concert at Kórinn in Kópavogur online on Yahoo. Where did all those people come from? It looked like all of Iceland was jammed in there.

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